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  • Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week
    Here are the stories behind the most amazing images in the world of science this week. A recap of the coolest photos featured on Live Science.
  • Spot a Stellar 'Odd Couple' In the Night Sky This Week
    Orion, the Mighty Hunter, will stand upright, high in our southern sky at around 8 p.m. this week, glittering like a large piece of celestial jewelry. Within it, we also find two immense and very different stars, Rigel and Betelgeuse.
  • Relive SpaceX's Return-to-Flight Falcon 9 Launch with These Awesome Pictures
    On Jan. 14, the private spaceflight company SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket carrying 10 commercial communications satellites in a flawless liftoff from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base. See how it happened with these awesome photos.
  • Bizarre Caterpillar That Makes Own Leafy 'Armor' Seen for 1st Time
    A caterpillar recently discovered in Peru wears a leafy tube of protective "armor."
  • The Most Amazing Space Stories This Week!
    The last human to walk on the moon died, 2016 set a record for global temperatures and scientists found ice spikes on Pluto. Here are our picks for the best and most important space stories of the week.
  • Evolution, Climate and Vaccines: Why Americans Deny Science
    Americans like science. So why do they reject scientific conclusions?
  • X marks the spot
    A beautiful morning in Northern Norway.
  • Star-hop from Pegasus to Andromeda galaxy
    The four stars of the Great Square of Pegasus are easy to find. Ready? Let's star-hop!
  • January 21, 1977: President Carter pardons draft dodgers
    On this day in 1977, U.S. President Jimmy Carter grants an unconditional pardon to hundreds of thousands of men who evaded the draft during the Vietnam War. In total, some 100,000 young Americans went abroad in the late 1960s and early 70s to avoid serving in the war. Ninety percent went to Canada, where after some initial controversy they were eventually welcomed as immigrants. Still others hid inside the United States. In addition to those who avoided the draft, a relatively small number–about 1,000–of deserters from the U.S. armed forces also headed to Canada. While the Canadian government technically reserved the right to prosecute deserters, in practice they left them alone, even instructing border guards not to ask too many questions. For its part, the U.S. government continued to prosecute draft evaders after the Vietnam War ended. A total of 209,517 men were formally accused of violating draft laws, while government officials estimate another 360,000 were never formally accused. If they returned home, those living in Canada or elsewhere faced prison sentences or forced military service. During his 1976 presidential campaign, Jimmy Carter promised to pardon draft dodgers as a way of putting the war and the bitter divisions it caused firmly in the past. After winning the election, Carter wasted no time in making good on his word. Though many transplanted Americans returned home, an estimated 50,000 settled permanently in Canada, greatly expanding the country’s arts and academic scenes and pushing Canadian politics decidedly to the left. Back in the U.S., Carter’s decision generated a good deal of controversy. Heavily criticized by veterans’ groups and others for allowing unpatriotic lawbreakers to get off scot-free, the pardon and companion relief plan came under fire from amnesty groups for not addressing deserters, soldiers who were dishonorably discharged or civilian anti-war demonstrators who had been prosecuted for their resistance. Years later, Vietnam-era draft evasion still carries a powerful stigma. Though no prominent political figures have been found to have broken any draft laws, Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush and Vice-Presidents Dan Quayle and Dick Cheney–none of whom saw combat in Vietnam–have all been accused of being draft dodgers at one time or another. Although there is not currently a draft in the U.S., desertion and conscientious objection have remained pressing issues among the armed forces during the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
  • Seoul virus outbreak associated with home-based rat-breeding facilities
    Experts from CDC are working with the Illinois Department of Health and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to investigate cases of Seoul virus infections among eight people who worked at several rat-breeding facilities in the two states. Seoul virus is not commonly found in the United States, though there have been several reported outbreaks in wild rats. This is the first known outbreak associated with pet rats in the United States.
  • Study of round worm that returns to life after freezing
    The first molecular study of an organism able to survive intracellular freezing (freezing within its cells) is published in a new paper that represents a milestone in scientists’ understanding of an extraordinary adaptation.
  • Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
    Using a novel approach for imaging the movement of immune cells in living animals, researchers have identified what appear to be the initial steps leading to joint inflammation in a model of inflammatory arthritis.
  • Age of Consent
      Social media has become a breeding ground for the modern sexual predator. But it's also provided a platform by which investigators can pinpoint and apprehend these deviants. Justin Payne isn't a professional law enforcement officer, but he's made it...Watch now →
  • Moonshine Glow: See Pluto's Moon Charon as a Crescent in NASA Photo
    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft keeps showing us things we've never seen before.The probe's latest unprecedented photo is simultaneously familiar and exotic: Pluto's largest moon, Charon, in crescent phase.
  • Space Station Flies in the Face of the Moon - Skywatching Video
    On January 14, 2017, Michel Breitfellner, Manuel Castillo, Abel de Burgos and Miguel Perez Ayucar set up telescopes near ESA’s Space Science Center in Madrid, Spain. They captured the International Space Center traverse the face of the moon.
  • Red vs. Blue: Why Necktie Colors Matter
    In power politics and business, there are only two colors of ties: red and blue.
  • Researchers unlock mechanism of drug resistance in aggressive breast cancer
    Scientists report findings of how triple negative breast cancer cells are able to bypass treatment with trametinib, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug that belongs to a class of commonly used anti-cancer drugs called kinase inhibitors. The researchers also reported findings from laboratory models of breast cancer testing a potential treatment approach that could prevent the onset of resistance.
  • Destination Pluto: NASA's New Horizons Mission in Pictures
    See photos from NASA's New Horizons mission to explore the dwarf planet Pluto.
  • Space Station Flies in the Face of the Moon - Skywatching Video
    On January 14, 2017, Michel Breitfellner, Manuel Castillo, Abel de Burgos and Miguel Perez Ayucar set up telescopes near ESA’s Space Science Center in Madrid, Spain. They captured the International Space Center traverse the face of the moon.
  • Ten Atomic Clocks Have Failed on Europe's Galileo Navigation Satellites
    Ten atomic clocks have failed onboard the European Union's Galileo navigation satellites, casting doubt on when the unfinished constellation's next batch of spacecraft will be orbited.
  • Facts About Baboons
    Baboons are the world’s largest monkeys. They have distinctive faces and butts.
  • ISIS destroys part of Palmyra's Roman Theatre
    Islamic State militants have destroyed parts of the second-century Roman amphitheater and an iconic monument known as the Tetrapylon in Syria's historic town of Palmyra, the government and experts said Friday. The Roman Theatre's pillared portico is shown here intact in March 2016  [Credit: AFP/Joseph Eid]It was the extremist group's latest attack on world heritage, an act that the U.N. cultural agency called a "war crime." A... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Cassini Gets Up Close and Personal With Saturn's 'Wavemaker' Moon Daphnis
    As NASA's Saturn mission skims the gas giant's rings, it's seeing incredible detail in the interactions between ring particles and a tiny moon's gravity.
  • 13 Scientifically Proven Signs You're in Love
    Studies led by anthropologist Helen Fisher have revealed that the brain's "in love" phase is a unique and well-defined period of time, and there are 13 telltale signs that you're in it.
  • Canadian Company UrtheCast Sells Two Satellites to Unnamed Government
    Canadian remote sensing company UrtheCast has sold two satellites of a planned constellation to an unnamed government.
  • The 15 Weirdest Presidential Inaugurations in US History
    Over the years, the otherwise serious ceremony of swearing in the president has had a few odd moments.
  • New 'smart needle' to make brain surgery safer
    A new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer has now been developed.
  • Facts About Einsteinium
    Einsteinium, the 99th element, was discovered in the debris from the first hydrogen bomb test.
  • Hawaiian Road Cut Off By Lava Flow Seen From Space | Video
    The volcanoes of Big Island, Hawaii have been imaged by the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Sentinel-2A satellite. A road along the coast line has been “discontinued” by a lava flow according to Kelsea Brennan-Wessels of ESA’s Earth From Space series.
  • Hawaiian Road Cut Off By Lava Flow Seen From Space | Video
    The volcanoes of Big Island, Hawaii have been imaged by the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Sentinel-2A satellite. A road along the coast line has been “discontinued” by a lava flow according to Kelsea Brennan-Wessels of ESA’s Earth From Space series.
  • New genetic engineering technique could help design, study biological systems
    A new technique will help biologists tinker with genes, whether the goal is to turn cells into tiny factories churning out medicines, modify crops to grow with limited water or study the effects of a gene on human health. The technique allows scientists to precisely regulate how much protein is produced from a particular gene. The process is simple yet innovative and, so far, works in everything from bacteria to plants to human cells.
  • Number of women who take maternity leave has stalled
    The number of U.S. women taking maternity leave has not changed in 22 years despite factors that suggest it should be increasing, a new study found. During the same time, the number of fathers taking paternity leave more than tripled.
  • Think binge drinking is safer for your liver than regular heavy drinking? Think again
    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) occurs on a spectrum of severity. The majority of people who drink excessively develop a fatty liver, which though often symptom free, can progress to a state of inflammation, fibrosis, and cell death that can be fatal. Little is known about liver disruption that may occur in problem drinkers who are not alcohol dependent. To help understand the development of ALD, this study used a rodent model to examine differences in liver damage between binge drinkers and heavy drinkers.
  • Atlas V Rocket Launches US Missile-Warning Satellite
    A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket blasted off from Florida today (Jan. 20) to put a missile-detection and early warning satellite into orbit for the U.S. military.
  • Launch Photos: SBIRS Geo-3 Missile-Warning Satellite
    The U.S. Air Force's SBIRS Geo-3 missile-detection satellite is scheduled to launch atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on Jan. 20, 2017. See photos of the satellite and its liftoff here.
  • The Science of Being President: Can Trump Make Real Change?
    A scholar of presidential power looks at personality, rationality and the institution of the presidency for clues about what the incoming administration can accomplish.
  • Discovery of Lost Dark Age Kingdom in Galloway
    Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.
  • Blastoff! Missile-Detecting Satellite Launches Aboard Atlas V Rocket | Video
    The Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) Geo-3 satellite was launched aboard the United Launch Alliance (ULA) rocket from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on January 20, 2017.
  • WATCH LIVE NOW! US Air Force Launches SBIRS GEO-3 Missile Warning Satellite
    The U.S. Air Force's SBIRS Geo-3 satellite is scheduled to launch atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket Friday (Jan. 20) at 7:42 p.m. EST (0042 GMT on Jan. 21). Watch the liftoff live here at Space.com, courtesy of ULA.
  • Did Trump Dump Climate Change? White House Website Scrubbed Clean
    Climate scientists reacted with dismay, but not necessarily surprise, upon learning that President Donald Trump's new administration had removed the climate change page from the White House website.
  • Humans, not climate change, wiped out Australian megafauna
    New evidence involving the ancient poop of some of the huge and astonishing creatures that once roamed Australia indicates the primary cause of their extinction around 45,000 years ago was likely a result of humans, not climate change.
  • #DoesItFart: Database Answers Your Burning Questions About Animal Gas
    Spurred by an innocent query posed to a biologist on Twitter, scientists are assembling a database of animal life to answer the burning question, "Does it fart?"
  • Light's Out: Asteroid Triggered Freezing Darkness That Killed Dinos
    When a giant asteroid careened into Earth about 66 million years ago, the enormous collision led to the formation of an airborne "curtain" of sulfate molecules that blocked the sun's light and led to years of freezing cold and darkness, a new study finds.
  • Geoengineering Earth's Atmosphere: How It Could Affect Astronomy
    Creating clouds in the sky or redirecting sunlight to bring down the Earth's temperature could have an effect on astronomy.
  • 6 Things to Know About Trump and NASA
    Ahead of Donald Trump's presidential inauguration tonight (Jan. 20), here are six things to know about the soon-to-be-president's actions and projected plans relating to NASA.
  • Facebook Live and Book Giveaway Monday: 'The Glass Universe' by Dava Sobel
    Tune in Monday (Jan. 19) on Facebook Live to ask questions and for a chance to win a copy of Dava Sobel's new book, "The Glass Universe."
  • Cassini Gets Up Close and Personal With Saturn's 'Wavemaker' Moon Daphnis
    As NASA's Saturn mission skims the gas giant's rings, it's seeing incredible detail in the interactions between ring particles and a tiny moon's gravity.
  • Air Force to Launch Missile-Warning Satellite Friday: Watch It Live
    A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the SBIRS Geo-3 missile-detection satellite for the U.S. military Friday (Jan. 20) at 7:42 p.m. EST (0042 GMT on Jan. 21). Here's how to watch it live.
  • $40 billion a day for solar super-storms
    The probability of another event like the 1859 Carrington event is - at any given time - low. But many believe it's "almost inevitable" one will occur, eventually. A new study explores the risks.
  • All about freezing rain
    The science of freezing rain. What causes the dangerous winter weather element that can paralyze cities.

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