Get Ready For The Perseid’s Meteor Shower in August


The Perseid meteor shower is one of the brighter meteor showers that occurs every year and will peak on the night of August 12 and early morning hours of August 13. Find out when and where to watch.

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Discovery: At least seven planets orbit TRAPPIST-1


At about 40 light-years (235 trillion miles) from Earth, the system of planets is relatively close to us, in the constellation Aquarius. Because they are located outside of our solar system, these planets are scientifically known as exoplanets.

This exoplanet system is called TRAPPIST-1, named for The Transiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope (TRAPPIST) in Chile. In May 2016, researchers using TRAPPIST announced they had discovered three planets in the system. Assisted by several ground-based telescopes, including the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, Spitzer confirmed the existence of two of these planets and discovered five additional ones, increasing the number of known planets in the system to seven.

Super Moon 14 Nov 2016: Closest Full Moon to Earth Since 1948 and until 2034


The Supermoon on November 14, 2016, will be the closest a Full Moon has been to Earth since January 26, 1948. The next time a Full Moon is even closer to Earth will be on November 25, 2034 (dates based on UTC time).

The best time to view the Super Moon is at Moonrise, weather permitting, of course. At this time, illusion mixes with reality to make a low-hanging Moon look unnaturally large when compared to foreground objects.

** Livestream included

A Rare Full Moon on Christmas Day 2015


Not just the Christmas tree will bring light this year on Christmas, there will also be a full moon in the sky, which is special.
The last time this happened was 38 years ago, in 1977.

So do not forget to look outside, because the next chance you’ll get to see this phenomenon at Christmas won’t be until 2034.

“Spooky” The Halloween Space Rock Bears An Eerie Resemblance To A Skull


Asteroid 2015 TB145, which has been nicknamed “Spooky” and the “Great Pumpkin” by some, was first discovered by astronomers with the University of Hawaii’s PANSTARRS-1 survey on Oct. 10. According to NASA, the asteroid is about the size of a football stadium, and could be up to 2,130 feet across. The asteroid poses no danger to Earth, and has missed our planet on Halloween (Oct. 31) at 1 p.m. EDT (10 a.m. PDT, 17:00 UTC), by a distance of 300,000 miles (480,000 kilometers), which is just beyond the orbit of the moon.

The large space rock is most likely a dead comet that, fittingly, bears an eerie resemblance to a skull.