The Legend of the Yogi Man (Orang Malu) also known as “The Weeping Buddha” or “Shy Man Buddha”


The Legend of the Yogi Man

The Legend of the Yogi Man (Orang Malu) also known as “The Weeping Buddha” or “Shy Man Buddha”

The legend of the Yogi Man is said to be from the old country of Java. It is about a man, so ashamed by the choices of the human race, that he chooses a life of meditation in order to reach out to others as a teacher. As a humble and reserved man, his sacrifice was his offering.

There is more than one version about its origin and meaning though, varying from Java to Bali, Indonesia.

Here are some of them:

– The sculpture represents the need for introspection of one’s self, one’s own mind, and not the physical world around us.
– Another says the Weeping Buddha is crying for all the pain and suffering in the world.
– Another says the Shy Yogi assumes the fetal position and presses his forehead to his hands in a pose said to awaken the mystical third eye.
– Yet another says the Weeping Yogi is in eternal mourning and saddness after learning of the death of his own son who he unknowingly killed in battle.

It is said of the Yogi Man that he cries for the suffering in the world. Still, he can be happy in his heart because he has found peace and happiness from within by reaching one person at a time.

In the Yogi man pose, you will find the symbols of his teachings. 

 

The yogi man from behind

The yogi man from behind

If you see the Yogi Man from behind, you can see a human heart; the source of life and energy.

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The yogi man from aside

The yogi man from aside

 

 

From the side, you can see the arms in the form of a fetus; the symbol of new life, purity and cleanliness.

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The Legend of the Yogi Man

The Legend of the Yogi Man (Orang Malu) also known as “The Weeping Buddha” or “Shy Man Buddha”

If you view the Yogi Man from the front, look closely and you will discover his smiling face; the head is the nose, the hands are his teeth and the ears are his eyes.

The Yogi man teaches modesty, strength, energy and the choice of rebirth. The Yogi Man expressed that life is like a circle. There is no beginning, no end, but a constant opportunity for new beginnings.

The Yogi Man is placed in the room to the left as you enter, with his head facing the entrance. He will influence everything that passes by him with his calm, positive energy.

Allow the Yogi Man to attract attention so that people will be drawn to put their hands upon his head. When the person is drawn to him, the Yogi Man serves his life’s purpose reminding us that through modesty and strength, positive energy can be directed towards new beginnings..

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Orang-Malu is related to a legendary episode in Buddha’s life.

The Buddha reflected on the Universe, when sorrowful for the pains of the world and deeply concerned about the fate of humanity, he assumed a specific posture, which tradition calls the “circle of life”.

The Buddha, sitting cross-legged in the traditional meditation pose, closed on himself, with his head between his hands, has a round, cyclical form. His bent arms look like a fetus, the start of human existence; the back looks like a large heart, the feelings that drive life; the head and hands that hold it, seen from above, evoke a smiling face, the happiness that surprises us; and finally the crossed legs can look like big wings on which to free ourselves and reach eternal life.

In Indonesia, the statue that represents and reminds everyone of this ancient Buddhist legend is called Orang-Malu. It is the statue of the “circle of life”. 

Life of Siddhartha Guatama, the historical Buddha: conventional dates: 566-486 B.C.E. (According to more recent research, revised dates are: 490-410 BCE).

Siddhartha Gautama, known as the Buddha, was born in the fifth century B.C. in what is now modern Nepal. His father, Suddhodana, was the ruler of the Sakya people and Siddhartha grew up living the extravagant life of a young prince. According to custom, he married at the young age of sixteen to a girl named Yasodhara. His father had ordered that he live a life of total seclusion, but one day Siddhartha ventured out into the world and was confronted with the reality of the inevitable suffering of life. The next day, at the age of twenty-nine, he left his kingdom and newborn son to lead an ascetic life and determine a way to relieve universal suffering.

For six years, Siddhartha submitted himself to rigorous ascetic practices, studying and following different methods of meditation with various religious teachers. But he was never fully satisfied. One day, however, he was offered a bowl of rice from a young girl and he accepted it. In that moment, he realised that physical austerities were not the means to achieve liberation. From then on, he encouraged people to follow a path of balance rather than extremism. He called this The Middle Way.

That night Siddhartha sat under the Bodhi tree, and meditated until dawn. He purified his mind of all defilements and attained enlightenment at the age of thirty-five, thus earning the title Buddha, or “Enlightened One”. For the remainder of his eighty years, the Buddha preached the Dharma in an effort to help other sentient beings reach enlightenment.

 


More info

Indonesia
History of Indonesia
Timeline of Indonesian history
Detailed timeline of Indonesian history
Indonesian Folklore
Timeline of Buddhist History

 


(Posted to Bookofresearch @ Facebook June 18 2012)

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